Advertisement

  • News
  • Columns
  • Interviews
  • BW Communities
  • Events
  • BW TV
  • Subscribe to Print
  • Editorial Calendar 19-20
BW Businessworld

BW Woman: Hail That Woman Voice

There is no singular “woman voice” that speaks for the female gender, but there are ways for women in any business or any position of authority to be better heard, so that their contributions to vital decision making is fully realised

Photo Credit :

1468822643_OlOwEu_success.jpg

No matter where on the globe a person resides, what is clear is that we are living in a world that’s unpredictable and for many, unsettling. Leaders in business and in government who survive and thrive in this kind of ever changing environment have to be able to cope and adapt to the ever shifting sands beneath them.

The ability to retain perspective in times of volatility is key to success and is a skill well-learned by many women from an early age. While commerce and industry have been mostly a man’s world, women and young entrepreneurs are helping reshape leadership models. Preparing for success in tomorrow’s world requires incorporating these views into strategic planning now.

In every country, most women learn to juggle multiple roles simultaneously. Perhaps, the combination is wife, mother, daughter and CEO, in whatever order she chooses to prioritise those roles. Often, the priority of the roles shift depending on the circumstances of the day. This fosters an inherent ability, almost like breathing, to adapt to shifting sands and lends itself well to the times we are now living in.

There is no singular “woman voice” that speaks for the female gender, but there are ways for women in any business or any position of authority to be better heard, so that their contributions to vital decision making is fully realised.

Over a dozen nations have democratically elected women leading their countries. Clearly, these women have learned to navigate choppy waters, but they didn’t get there alone. Who helped them reach those positions and what can today’s leaders do to foster similar successes, regardless of specific location and work environment?

Secretary Hillary Clinton’s recent loss in her race for the US White House has many Americans searching for perspective. Regardless of political party, some women are taking her loss personally, because the US hasn’t yet had a female President and Secretary Clinton appeared to be on the precipice of achieving that goal.

Assessing the lessons learned from her loss requires evaluating the political landscape. The tumultuous landscape she faced isn’t unique to the US, but is seen in many populist upheavals occurring globally. “Brexit” is a recent upending of the status quo that many thought would never materialise.

It’s natural to do a post-mortem of the Clinton campaign, but it’s important to keep perspective of factors that weighed in on that result, while continuing to advance contributions women make in business and in governmental leadership roles.

Mentoring young people, especially young women, to engage in the complex problem solving found in a global economy will take conscious effort and commitment. After a decade working with youths at the Colorado state legislature on a wide range of tough policy issues like teen suicide, substance abuse and competing for jobs in a global economy, I’m convinced that mentoring and seeking input from young people, many of whom have already witnessed much turmoil personally or through social media, are the most valuable ways to plan for a more stable future. New leadership in every setting must be thoughtfully cultivated long in advance.

Stepping back to see what you and your work environment are doing to meaningfully incorporate the views and voice of women and the young people today may be the lifeboat you never knew you and your business needed until tomorrow gets here.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the article above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this publishing house. Unless otherwise noted, the author is writing in his/her personal capacity. They are not intended and should not be thought to represent official ideas, attitudes, or policies of any agency or institution.


Ellen S. Roberts

The author is State Senator, and president, Pro Tempore

More From The Author >>