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Parliamentary Committee Backs Removing 'No-detention Policy'

The committee observed that the sanction of enactment of RTE Act, the focus on quantitative expansion of education has put the quality of teaching and learning on the back seat

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The Parliamentary Standing Committee on Human Resource Development has backed the government’s proposal to abolish the 'no detention policy' in schools. In the 300th report on the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education (Second Amendment) Bill, the panel has recommended allowing states their discretion in deciding about detaining a student in class 5 or class 8 or in both classes, or not to detain in any class till the completion of elementary education.

The Committee feels that learning of children must be assessed through examinations in classes 5 and 8. The committee welcomes the proposed amendment for regular examination in class fifth and eighth at the end of every academic year and hopes that learning of children would improve considerably in future.

The committee observed that the sanction of enactment of RTE Act, the focus on quantitative expansion of education has put the quality of teaching and learning on the back seat.

The panel said in its report that this has led to a situation which necessitates the review of the RTE Act. It is a fact which cannot any longer be ignored. The National Council of Education Research and Training's (NCERT) National Achievement Survey or Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) have consistently revealed the abysmally low learning levels among school children which is a cause of serious concern for the committee.

With the no detention policy in place, there is no such pressure on the children to learn and on the teachers to teach and therefore, there was a need for policy change so as to improve the learning of children at elementary stage of education.

The Bill seeks to substitute Section 16 of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education (RTE) Act, 2009 which provides that no child admitted in a school shall be held back in any class or expelled from school till the completion of elementary education.

The committee suggests that common guidelines may also be issued to all states/UTs with respect to the  detention policy.


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