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Mumbai: Increased vegetable prices trouble customers

Mumbai: Increased vegetable prices trouble customers

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Mumbai (Maharashtra) [India], November 1 (ANI): The vegetable prices in Mumbai are skyrocketing with the price of onions touching Rs 100 per kilogram. The increased rates are troubling both the vendors and customers as they complain about the high prices that have reduced the buying capacity of consumers.
Kadambari who buys her weekly supply of vegetables from Swatantryaveer Savarkar Bhaji Market told ANI that due to inflated prices, her monthly budget has been affected adversely.
"The vegetables are getting costlier per day at a time when most people lost their jobs due to lockdown. I'm still working and yet it is getting unmanageable. Onion is an essential commodity and it is around Rs 100-Rs 120 per kilogram. The monthly budget of the family is collapsing," she said.
Another customer Vishal said that he had to let go of several vegetables from his plate as it is getting difficult to afford them.
"Price of almost all vegetables has increased, especially that of onion. At one point onion was Rs 250 per kilogram. We were expecting the price to fall but it is still around Rs100 rupees per kilogram. It has become unaffordable. The monthly budget for vegetables has doubled from before lockdown. We have to eat, but we are rationing. We have let go of several vegetables from our plate as we can't afford to buy them," said Vishal.
The high vegetable prices have not just affected the consumers' pockets but also reduced the earning of the vendors. Shiv Gokhle who had been selling vegetables for the past 10 years informed the buying capacity of consumers has reduced.
"The customer who used to buy a kilogram of potato is managing with half a kilogram. The buying capacity is definably reduced. There is a shortage of vegetables in the market due to disruption in the supply chain during the COVID-19 lockdown, and that led to inflation. We are barely making a profit despite selling vegetables at such high rates," said Gokhle. (ANI)

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the article above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this publishing house. Unless otherwise noted, the author is writing in his/her personal capacity. They are not intended and should not be thought to represent official ideas, attitudes, or policies of any agency or institution.


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