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Rachna Chhachhi

Rachna Chhachhi is a certified holistic cancer coach and a nutritional therapist. She works across 21 countries to treat patients for cancer, autoimmune and lifestyle related diseases.

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Eating Out & Healthy Choices

Foods and lifestyle that don’t allow cancer cells growth are: fresh fruits and vegetables (60% of intake should be raw), raw nuts, high fibre foods like oats, quinoa, bajra, ragi, green tea, red wine and tofu in moderation.

Most People I treat are senior working professionals like you. Their lives are hectic, travel is crazy, and their most worrying question is: how can I stay on course with my goals if I’m eating out most of the time? And my response always is: there are healing foods in every corner of the world. You just need to choose well. So I’m listing out healthy choices. In order to stay healthy, one should eat anti-cancer, anti-diabetes and an anti-inflammatory foods that can help keep lipids and weight under control.

Breakfast buffets: Getting carried away by “just one bite” of everything is a big trap in buffets. For breakfast, be very focused that you need energy and anti-oxidants to keep your mind wired. Start with a plate of cut fruit, nuts and fresh juice, and follow it up with eggs or oats porridge with soy milk. Those on a weight loss programme, stick to fruits, eggs and nuts.

Italian restaurants. Eating here doesn’t mean just pastas and pizzas. Italian cuisine offers salads like Greek, Caesar, grilled vegetables, plus roast chicken, grilled fish, all of which are healthy choices. For salads, ask for the dressing on the side and opt for extra virgin olive oil instead. For grilled fish and roast chicken, ask for sauces they pour (lemon butter or brown sauce) on the side so that you can just sprinkle a bit for taste. These sauces are laden with calories. Avoid the bread basket.

Chinese restaurants. Stir fry tofu, stir fry fish, stir fry chicken, stir fry vegetables, steamed rice, steamed fish… options in Chinese restaurants are many. Just give one clear order. NO vinegar. Most high-end Chinese places don’t use MSG any longer, but if you’re going to a local Indian Chinese place, you will have to specify no MSG too.

Indian restaurants. It’s best to avoid Indian restaurants if you’re on a diet. The curries and dals are full of fat, cream and masalas that raise your triglycerides. If you must go, insist on veg skewer kebabs, simple chicken or fish tikka and fresh dry tandoori roti. Rest is fattening or with added colour. Forget the paneer tikka.

Coffee shops. A cup of coffee can come at a huge calorific cost if you’re opting for the cookie on the side. If you feel grubby at coffee time, opt for a fresh juice with a bowl of nuts instead. If you must have the coffee, avoid the milk and cookies, opt for nuts or a portion of eggs. Both have protein, which kill odd-time hunger pangs.

Dhabas. One tandoori roti, one dry item (no paneer). This will help you avoid the fats and spices in curries.

Happy eating!

Send in your questions to [email protected]

My father had prostrate cancer at age 70 and my mother had breast cancer at age 64. Does this mean that I have a cancer gene? What can I do to avoid it?

— Mithilesh Kumar, 47, Pune

Dear Mithilesh,

Reproductive organ and prostrate cancers that spring up after 60 are not genetic. However, since Cancer doesn’t discriminate, it’s always better, especially at your age, to start on an anti-cancer diet to reduce your risk. Foods and lifestyle that don’t allow cancer cells growth are: fresh fruits and vegetables (60% of intake should be raw), raw nuts, high fibre foods like oats, quinoa, bajra, ragi, green tea, red wine and tofu in moderation. Avoid milk, red meats and gluten, and make sure you exercise 40 minutes four days a week.


sentifi.com

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