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113 Million Indians Lost An Average Of Rs 16000: Cybercrime

64 per cent think storing their credit card and banking information in the cloud is riskier than not wearing a seatbelt: Norton

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Internet is more than using a social media site, we should take some serious steps to over come cyber crimes. Two in three Indian (66 per cent) consumers believe using public Wi-Fi is riskier than using a public restroom, according to Norton Cybersecurity Insights Report.

India has the world's third largest smartphone user base and the numbers are growing gradually. According to the latest report revealed by Norton, 60 per cent of people worry about experiencing cybercrime, 54 per cent of Indians believe it’s more likely their credit card information will be stolen online than from their wallet and one in two (52 percent) Indians have either personally experienced credit card fraud or know someone who has.

“Our findings reveal that consumer reservations are indeed grounded in reality. In the past year, 48 per cent of India’s online population or approximately 113 million Indians were affected by online crime,” said Ritesh Chopra, Country Manager, India, Norton by Symantec.

“Despite the threat of cybercrime in India, it hasn’t led to widespread adoption of simple protection measures to safeguard information online, with almost one in four Indians sharing passwords as a common practice,” he said.

Indian consumers affected by cybercrime lost on average 29.6 hours compared to an average of 21 hours across the 17 countries surveyed. On the other hand, an Indian lost an average of Rs 16,558 compared to the global average of Rs 23,878.

Key Findings
* Two in three Indian (66 per cent) consumers believe using public Wi-Fi is riskier than using a public restroom.

* Eight in 10 (80 per cent) say that it is riskier to share their email password with a friend than their car for a day.

* Close to two in three (64 per cent) think storing their credit card and banking information in the cloud is riskier than not wearing a seatbelt.


Tags assigned to this article:
technology internet cybercrime norton cybersecurity